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Licensing International Executive Voices article

May 6, 2020 No Comments »
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Here is a link to an article I wrote for Licensing International’s Executive Voices series:   https://licensinginternational.org/news/discernment-in-licensing-and-enforcement/

 


Dr. Fauci doughnuts

March 26, 2020 No Comments »
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A company in New York has begun offering “Dr. Fauci” doughnuts, which apparently involve edible paper on the doughnut with Dr. Fauci’s image printed on it.  Dr. Fauci has become a daily fixture in the coverage of the Covid-19 pandemic and a visible leader in the response and information concerning the outbreak.  Donuts Delite, the company selling the doughnuts on a nationwide basis, reportedly, will continue selling the doughnuts “as long as they are in demand.”  Here is a link to the story:  https://www.cnn.com/2020/03/26/us/dr-fauci-doughnuts-trnd/index.html   Dr. Fauci Doughnuts


Jason Mraz lawsuit illustrates important takeaways

January 2, 2020 No Comments »
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The lawsuit filed by Jason Mraz against MillerCoors, filed December 4, 2019 illustrates various important points and takeaways.  View the complaint here:  Jason Mraz v. MillerCoors complaint

Reportedly, MillerCoors was a sponsor of the 2019 BeachLife Festival in California where Jason Mraz performed.  His performance of course included one of his hit songs, I’m Yours.  The complaint alleges that MillerCoors posted an advertisement on Instagram for Coors.  The advertisement includes a clip of Mraz performing the song, the Coors logo, display of a can of Coors Light, the phrase “presented by Coors Light,” and in the comments, the added statement “Kicking off summer with the World’s Most Refreshing Beer at the BeachLife Festival.”

While a complaint is not the same as a ruling, at least two of the important takeaways from this case are:

  1. Social media is advertising.
  2. Sponsors do not acquire broad rights to third-party intellectual property simply by serving as a sponsor.

Both of these issues come up with some regularity in the business of representing a rights owner and the right of publicity.  Claiming that a social media post is somehow different from advertising on the basis that it is a fluid, user-controlled environment, or that serving as a sponsor entitles the sponsor to utilize the rights of anyone other than the party they are in contract with as a sponsor, both can lead to serious problems.


Taylor Swift’s right of publicity defense

July 23, 2015 No Comments »
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Taylor Swift recently stood up to Apple’s plans to use music for free, and Apple relented.  Apparently next on her list, Taylor Swift is taking on right of publicity infringements in China.  Her strategy could perhaps be described with  “the best defense is a strong offense.”

The July 21, 2015 edition of Wall Street Journal reports on a variety of licensed goods that Swift is introducing in China.  Taylor Swift’s popularity in China has predictably resulted in a lot of infringing goods in the marketplace.  The best way to combat such a problem, when one has the clout and market potential to do so as Swift does, is to make authorized goods available to meet demand.

Here’s a link to the WSJ article:

http://www.wsj.com/articles/taylor-swift-counters-knockoffs-in-china-1437492360

#rightofpublicity

#China

#infringements

#celebritylicensing

#TaylorSwift

#expertwitness

 


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